How The HomePod Is A Very Typical Apple Innovation

Although I do not have a source handy, I recall that Steve Jobs mentioned in an interview long ago that back during the Apple II days, he had figured out that there were many more would-be software enthusiasts (programmers) than hardware geeks (those that could build and program one-board computers like the Apple I). This philosophy was reiterated in many Apple commercials, for example the Macintosh tag-line, “The computer for the rest of us.”

This, I believe, is the philosophy behind the HomePod. 

  1. Audiophiles today spend a lot of money on buying high-end equipment, contemplating the acoustics of their living room and where to place their speakers. It is reasonable to assume that there are vastly more people who would simply appreciate great music, compared to the number of us who are eager to learn and implement acoustic theory.
  2. Like the Apple II, the Mac and the iPhone, the HomePod is a vastly more integrated system compared to the mainstream alternatives at the time. It is part of Apple’s ecosystem for a great music experience. This has the effect of making the “Chasm” easier to cross, accelerating widespread adoption beyond early adopters. 
  3. It addresses an existing and proven market. We know that there is a market for good sound. We know that people still enjoy entertainment in the living room. Unlike the “smart speaker” market which is undeveloped and still highly speculative, we know the consumer profile to target with the HomePod.

With the HomePod, Apple is taking a proven strategy that has worked for them many times. In my opinion, there is very little doubt that it will easily surpass other “smart speaker” sales, simply by virtue of targeting a proven and vastly larger market.